Clinical outcome data of chronic pain patients treated with cannabis-based oils and dried flower from the UK Medical Cannabis Registry


Background:

The following study evaluated the clinical outcomes of patients enrolled in the UK Medical Cannabis Registry, who were treated with inhaled dried flower (Adven® EMT2, Curaleaf International, Guernsey), and sublingual/oral medium-chain triglyceride-based oils (Adven, Curaleaf International, Guernsey) for chronic pain.


Methods:

In this cohort study, the primary outcomes were changes in validated patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) at 1, 3, and 6 months compared to baseline, and adverse event analysis. Statistical significance was defined as p < 0.050.


Results:

Three hundred and forty-eight (45.7%), 36 (4.7%), and 377 (49.5%) patients were treated with oils, dried flower, or both, respectively. Patients treated with oils or combination therapy recorded improvements within health-related quality of life, pain, and sleep-specific PROMs at 1, 3, and 6 months (p < 0.050). Patients treated with combination therapy recorded improvements in anxiety-specific PROMs at 1, 3, and 6 months (p < 0.050). 1,273 (167.3%) adverse events were recorded, with previously cannabis naïve users, ex-cannabis users, and females more likely to experience adverse events (p < 0.050).


Conclusions:

This study observed an association between initiation of CBMP treatment and improved outcomes for chronic pain patients. Prior cannabis use and gender were associated with adverse event incidence. Placebo-controlled trials are still necessary to establish the efficacy and safety of CBMPs for chronic pain.


Keywords:

Cannabidiol; Cannabis-based medicinal products; Chronic pain; Medical cannabis; Pharmacovigilence; Tetrahydrocannabinol.

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