Ky. AG joins 22-state letter opposing gas stove regulation

KENTUCKY — Kentucky’s top law enforcement officer joined a coalition of 22 states in opposing federal mandates on gas stoves. Attorney General Daniel Cameron signed on to the letter, which questions the constitutionality of regulations recently proposed by the Department of Energy.


What You Need To Know

  • Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron joined a letter to oppose federal regulations of gas stoves
  • The move comes in response to a Department of Energy proposal to require efficiency standards for cooktop appliances
  • The claim of an impending gas stove ban was sparked by comments from a Consumer Product Safety Commission official published in January that “any option is on the table” when it comes to regulating gas stoves, amid growing health concerns over the appliances
  • The White House says President Joe Biden would not support a ban, and the CPSC, an independent agency, says no such ban is in the works

The move comes in response to a Department of Energy proposal to require efficiency standards for cooktop appliances. Growing evidence shows gas stoves can produce dangerous indoor air pollution and even cause asthma in children. 

In their letter, the attorneys general claim the federal regulation would make many gas stoves currently on the market “illegal.” 

“The Biden Administration has proposed a rule that would make the use of many gas stoves illegal,” said Attorney General Cameron in a press release from his office. “This policy is unconstitutional and out of touch with the needs of average Kentuckians and Americans.”

The claim of an impending gas stove ban was sparked by comments from a Consumer Product Safety Commission official published in January that “any option is on the table” when it comes to regulating gas stoves, amid growing health concerns over the appliances. In the days after, discussion online evoked images of the government dragging four-burner cooktops from homes, as social media users shared memes of gas stoves with text like, “Don’t Tread On Me.”

The White House says President Joe Biden would not support a ban, and the commission, an independent agency, says no such ban is in the works.

“I am not looking to ban gas stoves and the CPSC has no proceeding to do so,” CPSC Chair Alex Hoehn-Saric said in a statement.

The notion that the government may regulate some stoves out of existence in the future isn’t totally baseless. In an interview published Monday by Bloomberg News, Richard Trumka Jr., a CPSC commissioner who was nominated to the post by Biden and has concerns that gas stoves emit dangerous levels of toxic chemicals, was quoted as saying: “Any option is on the table. Products that can’t be made safe can be banned.”

However, Trumka tweeted later that day to clarify that he was talking about regulation on new products.

“To be clear, CPSC isn’t coming for anyone’s gas stoves,” he wrote. “Regulations apply to new products.”

Last month, two U.S. senators — Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) and Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) — proposed legislation, the Gas Stove Protection and Freedom Act, which would prevent the Consumer Product Safety Commission from using federal dollars to ban new or existing gas stoves. In January, the American Public Health Association called on some federal agencies to acknowledge “links between gas stove emissions, nitrogen oxide (or NO₂) pollution and the increased risks of illness for children, older adults and people with underlying conditions,” Inside Climate News reported. 

The Associated Press contributed to this report.


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